Applications

So there you are, happily surfing away, maybe celebrating with a cup of coffee (or ten) because you just got out of the latest application and you are still breathing. When you stumble upon a site that announces a major grant, really a major major one. But the deadline is only 7 days away so…

Who’ll be chief mourner? I, said the dove.

So it was time for a war-room again, this time concerning some Iron-Age cemeteries. Often the first decision is about when it is time to stop collecting data and start to write up. The more data, the more solid the study. This meeting was much about that, what did we really want to investigate in…

”She came out of The Old Corral” – Sacred Cowboys

Anna Linderholm is a great friend who has now set up camp in Texas. She did her Ph.D. here in Stockholm, at the Archaeological Research Laboratory, where after she started to migrate to the west. First a few years in Durham, with Greger Larson, then Ireland, and eventually she got hired by Texas A&M University,…

Things that happens in the lab should stay there

I do not get to do much lab-work these days. Some will claim that there is a good reason for that, but I built a large part of my career on things I did in the laboratory, and I have seen some amazing things in there: baby-neandertal-ribs, Birger Jarls bones, attack ships burning off the…

“Frozen wind began to blow, Under my boots and around my toes”

I was mentioning the Sala Silvergruva material in a previous note. It is one of those materials that do have an interesting story to tell, but that repeatedly falls between larger chairs and never get written up. Some of the group-members (Maja, Natalya, Anna, Ricardo, and I) agreed to carry out an experiment, to lock…

Visitors from far far away

Tuesday the 28th of February and Wednesday the 1st of March we had visitors from the other side of the world. Professor Nikolaj Kradin from Vladivostok (where he is representing the Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences) and Professor Aleksej Tishkin from Barnaul (where he is the Vice-rector for Scientific and Innovative Development…

Wine, chocolate, and preliminaries

Perugia is an amazing town in central Italy. They make great chocolate there, it is full of history, they have a yearly workshop in anthropology there (one with an extension on African hominin sites!), and it is a good place to get preliminary data. I was there to give a guest lecture on the workshop,…

Trailing the Varyags

Another joy of this job I have got is the trips for collecting samples. The most recent one, now in late February, went to Kiev. There are many good things with Kiev. The food, the beauty of the monuments, the hospitality. This time a large portion of the groups went, Natalya, Maja, Torun, Anna, I,…

”Friday on my mind”

A vibrant group, with visitors from Ankara working in the laboratory, Natalya just back from a visit to Kazakhstan. That is a good Friday. When we close up for the weekend, we have a week with a methods-meeting, visitors, manuscript-work (mainly lead by Maja, but also supported by Anna, Torun, and Janne), and library-preparations behind…

The preacher came to town

And he preached the gospel of BEST! The 15th of February we had a joint methods-day, Mattias Jakobossons group, my group, and Mehmet Somels group. Uppsala, Stockholm, and Ankara. Between us we have some 20-30 people who are doing hands-on work in ancient DNA laboratories. Why we had a full day of sharing ideas on…

”The bars are iron, the walls are stone…”

All materials that ends up in our laboratories are interesting in one way or another. And such is the case for the relatively young material from Sala Silvergruva. From here we received three prisoners of war dated to four centuries ago. 400 years is a relatively young age in ancient DNA, and Sweden is a…