Old genetic data

We are in the business of breaking boundaries. And that is a fun business. One that has been going on since the introduction of NGS in 2005, and even after 13 years we have not seen the end of it. Such boundary is the temporal one, from just how far back can we get genetic…

CPG, next year will soon be now

The Center for Palaeogenetics is something that has been happening for some time now. When I look at the documentation, I note that we had the first meeting where I and Love Dalén suggested the concept to our departments and organizations about one and a half years ago. As it is a new type of…

What not to suggest to a research group

There are both good and bad things with publishing material that your group has been working with with intensity for a long time. Among the good things is the feeling of seeing the whole thing fly out in the public sphere, leaving the offices, and entering in to the larger scientific discussion. If it has…

The Sachsensymposion and ancient DNA

These days the Sachsensymposion is visiting Stockholm. It is an amazing amount of competence on the latter parts of the Iron Age that is gathered in this group, and they will dig into different aspects of the period over the next few days. But it is not the first time they are in this part…

Genetic self-testing and a professor from London

There are several companies out there ready to trace your ancestry if you are willing to donate some green bucks. And the quality on what you are getting back varies. I’ve never done myself for several reasons, the main being that I’m not particularly interested. I already know that my own genome is made up…

”Me dicen el clandestino”

We are doing this because we have a passion for the topics we are studying, and because we have confidence with the scientific process. But I would lie if I was to claim that the competition is not at least some part of the attraction. It is fun to know that other groups are working…

Thoughts on bioRxive

I have still not posted any paper I am single-senior on to bioRxive, not yet. Mainly because I still don’t know what to make of it, even though it has been the focus of more than one pub-evening. But since papers on bioRxive occurs more frequently as references in traditional papers, it it is slowly…

Paleoecology, genetics and human prehistory

I had the pleasure of giving the first lecture on the PGHP course today. And since Love Dalén, who is the signing organiser this year, is off somewhere in Siberia looking for funky extinct animals, I could focus it all on archaeology! Of course, the topics were such as coverage, NGS, fragment-size, and degradation, but…

A good few days came to an end

Mark Thomas ended the symposium with a healthy spoon of critics. Not so much on what we do, but more on the ways we let it filter out to the general public. It has indeed been a good few days. With descriptions of demography and chronologies, with descriptions on selection and chronologies, and with descriptions…

Class of some time ago

I will not deny that this feels like big class reunion. There is Mark Thomas who examined my thesis a long time ago, there is Eske Willerslev with whom I did several studies in the early days of Next Generation Sequencing, there is Matthew Collins who was an important part in the production of the…

New visitor to the group

Apart from the Wenner-Gren meeting there is still daily work going on. And with us in this daily work we will have Julia Kirylczuk working with us for a short while. She will help Maja out with some of her Russian material. Having visitors at all levels is good for us, as we get new…

Genes and nations

A few days ago we published a paper on genomic and strontium variation in Viking-age Sigtuna, but most of the response so far has been on a news-paper article referring to it. The news-paper article describes the study, but in the end of it I go beyond this particular paper when I am quoted saying…